SLO 4 - Students will be able to describe how they can use their discipline to make communities more sustainable

Leadership Minor Capstone - Social Impact Organizations

This is a capstone style course where most of the learning will be generated through a project with a social sector (social enterprise or nonprofit) organization, and by attending the weekly IMPACT Speaker series talks.  The groundwork for understanding the opportunities and challenges of the social sector will be covered through readings, TED style videos, student-led class discussions, and by a site visit to a local nonprofit organization.

Numerical Methods in Chemical Engineering

Many engineering problems require the use of advanced numerical methods for finding solutions to systems of linear, nonlinear, and differential equations, optimizing functions, and analyzing data. The general objectives of this course are to develop skills in properly defining and setting up chemical engineering problems and learning numerical methods that can be used to solve these problems. For this reason, this course provides a foundation of techniques that can be used to solve practical and complex engineering problems.

Mineral Surface Geochemistry

The biogeochemical cyclings of elements among geosphere, biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere are important processes controlling the fate and transport of contaminants and nutrients. This course will discuss the role of minerals in controlling contaminant and nutrient flow in natural environments, with assignments/projects related to mineral properties and surface reactions.

Sustainable Marketing

As environmental and social consciousness has grown in recent years, sustainability has emerged as an important market driver with the potential to grow profits and spur value creation. As a result, firms are increasingly making sustainability a strategic priority. This course considers sustainability through the lens of the marketing discipline. Through a combination of lectures, case studies, and class projects, this course examines the ways in which firms adapt their marketing strategies to meet business as well as societal needs.

Ecology

Ecology (2335) is a traditional course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

Technology, Representation and Design ("Data Walks")

Today, data on communities in Atlanta are more accessible than ever. Micro and macro changes in the makeup of local neighborhoods can be tracked through tax records, demolition and construction permits, and community surveys, among other sources; all of which might be easily downloaded by anyone with an internet connection. But data can be available, without necessarily being accessible.

Urban Ecological Design

Direct design of cities is often regarded as impossible owing to the fluidity, complexity, and uncertainty entailed in urban systems. And yet, we do design our cities, however imperfectly. Cities are created objects, intended landscapes, that are manageable, experienced and susceptible to analysis (Lynch, 1984). Urban design as a discipline has been focusing on “design” in its professional practices.

Smart and Sustainable Cities

This course is open to all undergraduate Civil and Environmental engineering majors. It will be taught in three parts. In Part I, the course will focus on providing a broad overview of how cities function by examining the various urban systems (e.g., transportation infrastructure, power supply, water distribution, buildings, etc.) and their interdependencies in relation to each other and to human and natural systems. This will be explored in the context of the role urban systems play in understanding and achieving urban sustainability.

Urban Transportation

This course is an introduction to urban passenger transportation policy and planning in the US with a sustainability focus. The course is structured around three components on which we will spend approximately five weeks each: 1) History, theory, and problem definition 2) The planning process, and 3) Solutions. Throughout the semester we will come to understand how our current transportation systems came to be, what a sustainable system would look like, policies and planning approaches that will help us to achieve it, and challenges we’re likely to face.

Green Construction

The course focuses on strategies and technologies to improve the energy efficiency and performance of buildings, and to reduce the environmental impact of buildings. The course emphasizes technical aspects of building design, materials selection, construction processes, and building operations. The use of objective criteria for assessing building “green-ness”, from meta issues such as building location and site – to operational details such as the selection of cleaning chemicals, is stressed throughout the course.

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