SLO 3 - Students will be able to evaluate how decisions impact the sustainability of communities

Special Topics: Environmental Sociology

Natural science can tell us what causes climate change. Engineering gives us the technologies we need to curb climate change. Sociology can explain why, despite having the knowledge and know-how, very little is being done about it. Environmental sociology explores the nexus of human and environmental systems. People exist on Earth and require its resources for survival, but they also exist in constructed social systems that constrain and guide human behavior.

Intro to Educational Tech/Educational Tech Theoretical Foundations

In this course we will use theories on learning and design to develop educational technology that facilitates learning about smart cities and sustainable communities.  Students will learn about the value of understanding audiences, theory, and design methods in creating effective educational technology, in the context of teaching the public about how smart cities could impact their lives.

Honors Biological Principles

The laboratory portions of the BIOL 1511 and 1521 courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. In partnership with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens (BIOL 1511) and the Piedmont Park Conservancy (BIOL 1521), students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

Macroeconomics of Innovation

The economy and the environment are tightly linked.  In this course, we explore the interconnections between economic activity and environmental stewardship, illustrate the perils of unchecked economic growth, and study possible solutions and policy interventions needed to ensure that economic development is achieved in a sustainable way.

Organizational Behavior

Organizational behavior (OB) is an interdisciplinary field that seeks to understand human behavior within organizations. It imports, integrates, and expands upon theory and research from areas such as psychology, sociology, economics, political science, anthropology, and communication. It places an emphasis on putting what we have learned from these fields into the context of the workplace.

Tokyo Smart City Studio Project

The urban design studio provides learning opportunities of students from city planning, architecture, engineering and policy. It focuses on physical form of c ties and plan making of ecologically sound, resilient and sustainable communities. The course introduces methods of representation, design, evaluation and decision making processes shaping sustainable communities. Students learn skills of design and their link to values of sustainability such as diversity, equity, ecological performance and climate sensitivity. 

Chemical Principles II

This Honors Program section of Chemical Principles II differs from traditional large lectures in two key areas: First, core chemical concepts are introduced by considering "big questions" in chemistry, typically pertaining to the challenge of powering the planet with clean energy. For instance, how do catalytic converters mitigating transportation emissions, and what are the impacts on pricing and availability of precious metals?

Environmental Measures

Prior to 2008, most of the world’s population lived in rural areas. Since then, and perhaps for the rest of human history, cities will be the dominant form of human habitation on this planet. It is therefore imperative that urban places are healthful and desirable. But how does one know if a city is healthy? What are the “vital signs” that indicate that everything is okay? These manufactured environments require enormous energy and material resources and create tremendous quantities and concentrations of wastes. Are they sustainable?

Semester in the City: Engaging Communities

“Semester in the City” seeks to familiarize students with nearby Westside communities that have historically faced, and continue to face serious sustainability challenges – even as they continue to develop significant strategies for positive change.  Students learn how ecological, social, and economic systems have operated in these neighborhoods and explore how policy and community mobilization approaches might be re-envisioned to improve liveability.

Energy, Environment, and Society

The quest for a sustainable energy future involves balancing a series of oftentimes competing goals. On the one hand, continued population growth, combined with increased energy consumption by citizens in ever-richer developing countries, require energy production to keep pace with growth in demand. Access to cheap energy has fueled global economic development, and there is widespread concern that any increases in energy prices will undermine economic growth.

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