SLO 1 - Students will be able to identify relationships among ecological, social, and economic systems

Sustainable Food Systems

Food nourishes not only our bodies, but our spirits, families, and communities. At its best, food is healthful, economically sustainable, culturally appropriate and environmentally beneficial. Yet, all too often and for too many people, the quantity, quality and character of food remains inadequate for individual nutrition and damaging to our economy, society and environment. Food production and distribution is increasingly mono-culture, globalized and processed, with significant impacts on human well-being, climate, environment, economy, and culture.

Social Impact: In-depth Exploration and Design

This course is for those curious (maybe even passionate) about social and/or environmental issues, who want to understand the root cause of those issues, and the challenges of providing evidence-based solutions. You will explore topics and master tools like: Impact Gap Canvas, Asset-Based Community Development, Human-Centered Design, systems thinking, social impact assessment, customer discovery, Theory of Change, and more.

Nature, Governance, and Sustainability in Costa Rica

This study abroad program will provide a unique opportunity for students to learn and live in the tropics of Central America. Students will take two classes, BIOL 4813 Tropical Biology & Sustainability and PHIL 3127 Science, Technology, and Human Values, that will introduce students to biological, governmental, and societal interactions that help communities protect natural resources, preserve biological diversity, support local innovation, strengthen societal ties, and bolster human capital.

GT 1000 - Creating Socially Sustainable Communities

This section of GT-1000 will explore the value in the social aspects of sustainability (e.g., civic engagement, community building, etc) and how to incorporate these aspects into the academic, professional, and everyday experience. Students will engage in discussions and activities that will encourage them to reflect on how their academic and career goals impact and contribute to sustainability and sustainable communities.

GT 1000 SL4

This seminar course is designed to help you make a successful transition to college by becoming better acquainted with the academic and social environments here at Georgia Tech. Through the course, you will acquire strategies that promote academic, social, and professional success! This is a highly interactive course that requires active student participation and working collaboratively in small groups.  

The focus of this section of GT 1000 is "Creating Sustainable Communities," which will be integrated into all of our assignments and activities. 

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Standing Peachtree and Indigenous New Media

Indigenous knowledges and stories are mapped onto the land beneath your feet and mediated through oral and material modes. Indigenous knowledges and stories continue to be sovereign, embodied through various methods of meaning-making. This course focuses on the rhetorical practices of Native/American Indian communities and how those practices “make” meaning within indigenous communities.

Cultures of Waste: Disease and Environment

This course explores literary and cultural representations of bodily and industrial waste alongside wasting diseases to explore how the nineteenth century produced ideas about waste that continue to influence contemporary work in the fields of epidemiology, civil engineering, public health, environmental science, and medicine.

Climate Resilience

The rapid change in climates across the globe requires us to determine which human and ecological systems will be most affected and how to alleviate climate vulnerability, which is captured by the concept climate resilience. While past studies have largely focused on climate resilience through the lens of either ecological or social systems, there is great potential in quantifying and optimizing climate resilience through the study of integrated social-ecological systems. Social, agricultural, and ecological systems are spatially and functionally integrated.

Philosophy of Food

This course is divided into two parts:  1. In the first part of the course, we will discuss a number of topics in food studies, including food justice, consumer ethics, food and identity, industrial plant and animal agriculture and alternatives; workers;  verconsumption and obesity, and paternalism and public health. Through this part, special attention will be paid to the concept of "sustainable communities" and to how various food-related decisions affect the ability of communities to function sustainably.

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