SLO 1 - Students will be able to identify relationships among ecological, social, and economic systems

Public Health Analytics

The socioecological model of public health clearly establishes the importance of physical and social environments in building healthy, sustainable communities and influencing population health. This scientific paradigm is firmly embedded in the idea that the health status of an individual is simultaneously produced by individual biology and their surrounding physical, social, cultural and political context.

Economics of the Environment

Is economic growth incompatible with environmental quality? This course discusses how human social and economic behavior impacts and is impacted by the environment. We discuss how to design policies that promote economically and environmentally sustainable communities such as carbon pricing and property-rights approaches. In addition, we discuss how communities can manage environmental commons problems by relying on local knowledge, norms, and institutions.

Sustainability in American Literary Regionalism

In this section of English 1102, students will read and analyze novels, short stories, and movies grouped together under the genre of American literary regionalism. These texts, created between 1880 and 1950, are concerned with American small towns and rural areas, agriculture and farming science, and community health and development. We will investigate how an earlier generation of writers represented concepts of sustainability and equitability, and how these representations compare to modern-day writing on the same topics.

Race, Medicine, and Science

The primary objective of this course is to study the interrelationship of race, medicine, and science drawing on various literatures such as history, sociology, and anthropology. The course rigorously examines the social, political, and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category with a emphasis on American history.

Environmental Justice in Global Literature and Media

Students in this course learn about how communities in diverse parts of the world are meeting the challenges posed by unsustainable development and environmental degradation.

Fundamentals of GIS

Fundmentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a course designed to introduce students to the powerful world of geospatial information and technologies. Almost everything we do in life has a spatial element and this course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to utilize GIS in any discipline of their choosing. In this course, students will learn how to make digital, interactive maps and applications that can be used to help communities make informed decisions based in science.

Imagining the City

In this first year writing and communication course you will consider how your work at Tech and after Tech may interact with and affect urban communities and the people who live in them. We will begin by examining our own backgrounds--whether you're a life long city dweller or whether you grew up in a rural or suburban area--and how they have shaped our attitudes toward Atlanta and toward cities generally. These backgrounds, we will see, may condition our attitudes toward the development of urban space.

Immoral Energy: Slavery and Fossil Fuels in the Anthropocene

Energy systems are permeated with political and ethical questions, and no historical system demonstrates that as well as transatlantic slavery. Before fossil fuels, the bodies and labor of enslaved peoples powered trade. While at first slavery helped support the expansion of fossil fuels, eventually fossil fuels replaced slavery. This course will explore the ethical/moral valences of energy systems through a juxtaposition of transatlantic slavery and modern fossil fuels. The first half of the class will focus on the abolition debate.

Intro to Sociology

The study of sociology is the study of society, and this introductory course teaches students to see that human communities are more than a collection of individuals, self-determined and self-directing. The course examines structural inequalities, cultural conditions, and social institutions that pattern and shape human behavior. First, students learn that the world around them is not "natural" but rather conditional, and human behavior is not "innate," but mutable through socialization.

American Environmental History

This course surveys the complex ecological, economic, cultural, social, and political outcomes that have resulted from human interactions with the natural world, in the geographical region encompassing the United States.

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