SLO 1 - Students will be able to identify relationships among ecological, social, and economic systems

Un-Natural Disasters

This course will examine how films, novels, and short stories represent the relationship between technology and disaster. We'll trace complicated perceptions of technology back to the Industrial Revolution, seeing how technological innovations have been portrayed as both the cause of and the solution to acute social and environmental problems. We'll then look at depictions of technology in more recent disaster narratives.

One World is Not Enough

The course will explore work of contemporary novelists who draw from both eastern and western influences, stories that dwell beyond natural laws of time and space.  The class will consider how these authors expose and influence the changing face of our global community in the twenty-first century.  These novels wrestle with issues of personal and collective memory, accountability, interconnection, and the influence of one's choices and actions on future generations.

Urban Forest

Students work with the non-profit organization, Trees Atlanta, as well as multiple neighborhoods in Atlanta to investigate the various effects of tree canopy on the well-being of residents. (There are two sections to this course, HP for Honors Program students only, and SLS, which is open to all non-Honors Program students) 

Honors Ecology

Honors ecology is a team based, problem based course in general ecology. There are no lectures: students are expected to identify the relevant knowledge, learn and apply it to the given problem and are mentored by faculty through this process.  Student teams examine five ecological problems ranging from single species conservation/management to watershed health assessment. Several of these projects (changes in biological communities through time, watershed health) are focused on local communities.

Honors Organismal Biology

The laboratory portions of these courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.  In partnership with the Piedmont Park Conservancy, students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

Green Infrastructure: EPA Campus Rainwater Challenge

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Campus Rainwater Challenge, a national student design competition, is focused on creating green infrastructure and building sustainable communities on college campuses and across America.  The first half of the course will include tutorial seminars on stormwater management, green infrastructure, and understanding the social, economic and ecological relationships among Georgia Tech, the Emerald Corridor along Proctor Creek, the Westside Alliance neighborhoods and the Chattahoochee River.

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