Yes

Intergenerational Policy

How many of today's leaders and citizens remember the Constitution's Preamble mandate to "secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves AND our posterity"? Perhaps it's not possible to design such a balance: doing so requires an awareness of intergenerational ethics, an ability to build long-term benefits and costs into our current policy analyses, a realistic understanding of the capabilities of our social and political institutions, and knowledge about the cognitive limits of humans to perceive and plan for future decades.

Urban Policy/Urban Development Policy

In this course, students will learn the policy implications of Complex Adaptive Systems, which is how cities function as a series of networks, institutions, and systems. The course brings together urban planning, municipal management, and policy, which have not typically functioned together. Each class will feature a lecture and readings based on the topic of the class, as well as a guest speaker leading efforts at the government, nonprofit, grassroots, and corporate levels.

Race, Space, and Architecture in the United States

This course is interdisciplinary by nature, referencing the projects and methodologies of architects and architectural historians, as well as archaeologists, artists, designers, environmentalists, ethnographers, photographers, urbanists, sociologists, technicians, and writers. Although we will cover topics and themes across the U.S., our focus will decidedly be on the American South and we will leverage our location in Atlanta.

Chamber Choir

The course will offer interactive participation with choirs from other countries and cultures.

 

Engaging Global Communities

This course brings together students from six metro Atlanta institutions to provide them with a unique opportunity in cross-institutional community building, community partner engagement, and professional development, under the auspices of a global communities theme. The instructor team brings a wealth of expertise on the topic, and students will enjoy dynamic sessions led by Clarkston-based community partners and have the option of joining one or more of three Clarkston site visits throughout the term.

The Cultural History of Trees and the Tech Tower White Oak

In a recent episode of the television series Ted Lasso, Beard (Ted’s assistant coach) name-drops Suzanne Simard in a random comment. Prior to that conversation, he is seen reading Merlin Sheldrake’s recent book Entangled Life. Sheldrake and Simard study the complex interactions between trees, plants, fungi, and bacteria— work that points toward different research models and questions how we conceptualize life. Other scholars across many fields have in the last decade begun to rethink the complex entanglements of human and non-human lives, with trees figuring prominently.

Optical Properties of Nanoparticles

This course is designed for graduate students in the school of chemistry and biochemistry. Also, students from different academic units, including physics, materials science, electrical and chemical engineering, and others are encouraged to take this course. The course will highlight recent advances in the area of plasmonics and the focus will be on light-matter integration at the nanoscale, optical properties of nanoparticles, the unique world of metal nanoparticles, and the importance of metal nanoparticles for diverse applications including, electronics, photonics, and nanomedicine.

Special Topics: Equity and Community Engagement

Inequalities between and within communities across the United States have become glaringly obvious in the last several years due to intersecting disasters like poverty, pollution, climate change, and COVID-19. In this course, students will use historical and sociological approaches to explore community assets, vulnerabilities, and inequalities related to these intersecting disasters, as well as learn and apply respectful and appropriate ways to engage with communities during these disastrous times.

Sustainable Communities

This course focuses on social, artistic, cultural, and scientific dimensions of sustainability and the concepts of identity, diversity, social equity and inclusion/exclusion in the French context. This course will introduce students to sustainable communities in France through lectures, projects, videos, downloads from the Internet, and class discussions.

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