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Women in Literature, Science, & Technology

This writing and communication class focuses on women’s writing in the 20th and 21st centuries in literature, science, and technology. Through multiple modes of communication – fiction, poetry, essays, films, and academic scholarship – we think about the challenges, inequalities, and pleasures of women and the society and culture in which we operate.  

Empirical Economics Practicum I

This course utilizes some of the ideas and concepts of a relatively new movement "Data for Good" promoted by a few universities worldwide. Specifically, students will be able to work on a case project that explores employment patterns of different demographic groups during Covid-19 pandemic.

Special Topics: Arduino Prototyping

The course provides a hands on introduction to hardware prototyping with the Arduino platform. Arduinos are useful microcontrollers that support easy access to external sensors, motors, lights, or other components. The class covers the use of tools, various sensors and actuators, as well as an introduction to the programming of Arduinos. Some coding knowledge is beneficial, but the course itself does not require prior programming experience. The class will not provide an in-depth technological breakdown to cover e.g.

Japanese Discourse and Grammar

In JPN 4750/8803 "Japanese & Discourse" is the advanced Japanese course, the students learn Japanese discourse and grammar especially difference between the spoken and written language and male and female speech by watching TV drama, NHK documentaries, newspaper articles. The students will interact with Japanese University students via COIL (collaborative online interactive learning). This course explores issues related to SDGs, especially # 5 Gender equality &10 Reduce Inequalities in Japan.

Environmental Literature and Communication

The crisis of climate change demands that we understand the natural world and find new ways of communicating its value to each other. In many ways the lack of action on climate change is not a failure of science, but rather of science and environmental communication. This class looks to prepare Tech students by introducing them to environmental literature and communication, so that they can be better environmental communicators.

Foundations of Human Computer Interaction

The theme of the course this year is sustainability. The course, however, is limited to first year MS-HCI students.

Sustainability, Technology, and Policy

The goal of this course is to provide a solid introduction to the concept of sustainable growth and development. Students will learn how to professionally navigate the current debate on sustainability and to assess strategies to promote sustainable communities and a sustainable planet. The course will blend qualitative and quantitative analysis of sustainable development, with large use of data analysis to measure progress towards sustainable development.

Public Health Policy in Practice (Special Topics)

“Public health policies saved your life today and you didn’t even know it.” This is how health officials describe public health’s most successful policies, i.e., policies that prevent disease, disability, and death. In turn, public health policymakers, practitioners, and researchers say that public health suffers from a “crisis of invisibility”—ironically, the more successful the overall public health system is at keeping us well, the more we tend to overlook it.

Sounds Like Poetry: Song, Slam, and Spoken Word

Maybe you know a poem when you see one, but how do you know when you've heard one? Poetry is arguably the literary genre that's most interested in sound, but we spend more time looking at it than listening to it. In this class, we will explore the dynamics of spoken sound, especially in those subgenres where sound really matters, like rap, slam poetry, spoken word, and performed poetry of all kinds. Not coincidentally, some of the greatest artists working in these genres are LGBTQIA people of color.

Land Conservation

The goal of the Land Conservation course is to help students develop a broad understanding of the issues pertaining to the conservation of forests, wildlife habitats, wetlands, river corridors, scenic vistas, farmland, cultural landscapes, battlefields, greenways, recreational spaces, and public parks. In the course, we will review the literature on the subject as well as hear from practitioners in the field.

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