Undergraduate

Information and Communication Technologies and Development

This course focuses on information and communication technology (ICT) design, adoption, and use as seen through the lens of global development. We will begin with studying the history of technological advancement, the global development discourse (from the 1940s to the present era), poverty as experienced, before we engage with the design thinking process. We will then shift our gaze to particular domains of global development, discuss important questions and concerns in these areas of work in the present day, before asking what all this means for us as local and global citizens.

Foundations of Sustainable Systems

How can we accelerate progress towards a more sustainable world? How do we create sustainable systems for the 21st century? This course discusses how to employ a systems framework to advance sustainability at multiple scales, including a community, a region, a supply chain, a company, or an entire nation. The course considers sustainability from its theoretical foundations to its modern-day practice, incorporating environmental, economic, and social dimensions.

ABCD in Practice: Participatory Facilitation (SHORT COURSE)

This short course reviews the basics of Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) - working with communities based on their assets, or strengths - and then introduces participatory facilitation methods that can be used to implement ABCD with diverse stakeholders. These methods can be used by students and professionals alike to create truly equitable and participatory environments, whether that be in academic project work, in the community/field, or in their professional spaces.

In-Humanity: Cruelty/Literature/Media Syllabus

“In-Humanity: Cruelty/Literature/Media” is broken up into various categories of violence (war, massacre, genocide, ecological collapse) via literature, diverse media, and policy. We’ll be reading a novel, a graphic novel, short stories, and excerpts from theoretical texts, as well as looking at photographs and videos to investigate both historical and contemporary conflicts and upheavals.

English Composition 2 (Public Interest Technology)

This course focuses on current conversation surrounding disasters, calamities, and apocalyptic events, both in real life and fictional contexts, moving from the context of global perspectives on the end of the world to local efforts to mitigate apocalyptic events.

Engineering Psychology

Engineering psychology uses scientific knowledge about the perceptual, cognitive, and behavioral capabilities of humans to specify the design and use of human-machine systems (such as equipment, environments, tasks, jobs, and systems) for productive, safe, comfortable, and effective human use. In this course, you’ll learn about the capabilities and limitations of humans and how this knowledge informs engineering design principles of displays, controls, physical environments, human error, and automation.

Near Peer Mentoring: Experience in Urban Education

Mentors improve the chances that a child facing social and economic disadvantages will beat the odds and succeed. In this course each Georgia Tech student will engage in near-peer mentoring with high school students as they prepare for college. You will expand your understanding and empathy through exposure to experiences with education that are likely different in some ways from your own. You will also identify the issues that contribute to the persistent inequality in the US education system as well as the solutions that have been proposed to address them.

 

Atlanta's Persistent Memory

How do we, as (part-time, full-time, or temporary) citizens of Atlanta, uncover the diverse layers of the past which structure our campus, the city, and other places that we inhabit, pass through, or imagine? Atlanta’s streets, avenues, green spaces, and buildings may look permanent but instead are in a constant state of flux. What was here before? What will be here in the future?

Socio-Economic Ecologies of the Atlanta Home

This course focuses on the socio-economic ecologies that support (or not) the sustainable Purpose Built Communities Model. Organizations like the Grove Park Foundation in Atlanta aim to target issues like unequal housing and education through initiatives such as Mixed Income Housing, Cradle-to-College Education, and community health and wellness programs. However, issues like gentrification, environmental degradation, and economic crises hinder this equitable decision making.

The End is Nigh, Eventually: Global and Local Approaches to the Pre-Apocalypse

Apocalypse (noun): From the Greek apokálypsis, 'Uncovering' The end of the world. The great calamity. The apocalypse. Discussions of climate change, natural disasters, pandemics, and violence have become an everyday occurrence, and the rhetoric surrounding these ideas is often nihilistic -- focused on the inevitability of our destruction – or post-apocalyptic – fixated on how humanity recovers after catastrophic events. But what does it mean to experience the time preceding an apocalypse?

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