Core Area C: Humanities, Fine Arts, Ethics

Japanese Discourse and Grammar

In JPN 4750/8803 "Japanese & Discourse" is the advanced Japanese course, the students learn Japanese discourse and grammar especially difference between the spoken and written language and male and female speech by watching TV drama, NHK documentaries, newspaper articles. The students will interact with Japanese University students via COIL (collaborative online interactive learning). This course explores issues related to SDGs, especially # 5 Gender equality &10 Reduce Inequalities in Japan.

Field Work Abroad (Local Sustainability Practices)

NOTE: This course is taught at Georgia Tech Lorraine (GTL) in Metz, France.

Environmentalism and Ecocriticism

Environmentalism and Ecocriticism—The Cultural History of Trees.  This seminar will examine tree as they function in human technological practices, in our culture, and as source of food. We will study how trees figure in current debates about the environment, including tree structure and forest composition, trees and the law, arguments about plant intelligence, and sustainable food production in an era of environmental degradation. Not content with just reading about trees, we will also do some harvesting.

Sounds Like Poetry: Song, Slam, and Spoken Word

Maybe you know a poem when you see one, but how do you know when you've heard one? Poetry is arguably the literary genre that's most interested in sound, but we spend more time looking at it than listening to it. In this class, we will explore the dynamics of spoken sound, especially in those subgenres where sound really matters, like rap, slam poetry, spoken word, and performed poetry of all kinds. Not coincidentally, some of the greatest artists working in these genres are LGBTQIA people of color.

This is Fine - Humor, Media, and Climate Change

Recent IPCC predictions argue that the world has ten years to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by half. Ten years to take a range of overlapping and dependent cultural, economic, and technological systems and reduce their carbon footprint by half. And only about thirty years to make these systems carbon neutral. The world Tech students will enter after ‘getting out’ will be dramatically warmer and more unstable that the one their parents and grandparents entered.

The Poetics of Sustainability: Race and the Environment

Utilizing our WOVEN curriculum, this Serve-Learn-Sustain affiliated course will explore the intersections of race, immigration, and the environment as urgent social, political, and ecological issues through the lens of poetry.

Back to the Future

The cumulative consequences of the Anthropocene—warming, carbon emission, species loss, deforestation, melting, ocean acidification, and the global waste crisis—make the future of life on earth difficult to imagine. Throughout most of human history, we have relied on models such as generational inheritance or market growth to figure what lies ahead, but if the last few years are any indication, the rhetoric we use to project the future is increasingly insufficient.

French Culture II

Proficiency-based introduction to selected socio-cultural aspects of France with a focus on sustainability-related issues and initiatives in France and the francophone world (green transportation, renewable sources of energy, ecovillages, zero plastic initiatives, social entrepreneurship etc.); incorporates grammar review. Conducted in French.

Writing, Reading, and Resilience

I am in conversation with CARE/Counseling Center to devise materials that could extend these tools beyond the classroom and into the broader Georgia Tech student community. In addition, I intend reach out to a new community partner to explore how we might address the inequalities of mental health and self-care for people of color. I would like to invite the Atlanta-based art-activist group “The Nap Ministry” to give a workshop to the class.

The Shape of the City: Gentrification and Culture in Atlanta and America

Gentrification—the economic and cultural “revitalization” of American cities--has been, for better or worse, the defining feature of urban life in the twentyfirst century. As late as the 1990s, the “inner city” was often portrayed in journalism and popular culture as a decaying, crime-ridden ghetto; now it is often seen as a booming, culturally vibrant, economically desirable playground for hipsters and creatives—at least those who can afford it. How did this happen? Is it good or bad? Can gentrification go on forever?

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