Core Area A1: Communication Outcomes

Postcolonial Ecofeminism

This course will enable you to become a more effective communicator in various modes, media, and genres by introducing you to diverse representations of postcolonial ecologies. In this course you will watch films and documentaries, read essays, graphic narratives, and short stories, and look at digital story maps to explore the plurality across media of rhetorical constructions of environmental justice. We will begin with analyzing what environmental justice looks like in the postcolonial condition.

Women in Literature, Science, & Technology

This writing and communication class focuses on women’s writing in the 20th and 21st centuries in literature, science, and technology. Through multiple modes of communication – fiction, poetry, essays, films, and academic scholarship – we think about the challenges, inequalities, and pleasures of women and the society and culture in which we operate.  

Representing Environmental Justice

Even as the proliferation of new media platforms has made it possible for individuals and institutions to publicize the causes and consequences of climate change to a broader audience than ever before, the interrelationship between environmental degradation and racism remains underrepresented.

Sustainable Communities and the Refugee Experience: The Community, Knowledge, and Praxis of Atlanta-area Refugee Organizations

The questions surrounding the refugee experience are the principal humanistic questions of the twenty-first century. Readings and films in this course will demonstrate how sustainability, growth, and progress must be shaped by an understanding of the life, work, and future of people displaced by war, environmental crises, and violence (including the violence of the state upon its own citizens).

Technical Communication and Environmental Justice

Even as the proliferation of new media platforms has made it possible for activists and community organizations to publicize the causes and consequences of climate change to a broader audience than ever before, the overlap of environmental degradation and racism remains underrepresented.

Environmental Literature and Communication

The crisis of climate change demands that we understand the natural world and find new ways of communicating its value to each other. In many ways the lack of action on climate change is not a failure of science, but rather of science and environmental communication. This class looks to prepare Tech students by introducing them to environmental literature and communication, so that they can be better environmental communicators.

Sounds Like Poetry: Song, Slam, and Spoken Word

Maybe you know a poem when you see one, but how do you know when you've heard one? Poetry is arguably the literary genre that's most interested in sound, but we spend more time looking at it than listening to it. In this class, we will explore the dynamics of spoken sound, especially in those subgenres where sound really matters, like rap, slam poetry, spoken word, and performed poetry of all kinds. Not coincidentally, some of the greatest artists working in these genres are LGBTQIA people of color.

Narratives of Black Girlhood

This course will introduce students to varied narratives of Black girlhood through a series of novels, short stories, essays, and other literary texts. Particularly in Black women’s writing, students will explore the ways these writers depict Black girlhood and examine the rhetorical choices these writers make in addressing issues of gender, race, class, and other variables that influence identity formation.

Energy and Environment in the Humanities

This course introduces students to narratives of complex relationships between human beings and the environment, including the impact of unchecked energy consumption on the global climate as well as vulnerable indigenous communities. Besides analyzing environmental literature and media that employ a range of rhetorical strategies, students in this course will compose digital projects to convey their own arguments regarding contemporary environmental debates.

Black in America

In this course, we will consider how different forms of communication--from novels to film and poetry to comics--represent and reflect upon the history of black experience in America. We will be processing, discussing, and debating some of the key issues behind the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as responding creatively to topics such as police and prison reform, reparations, black representation in media, appropriation of black culture, and medical ethics related to race.

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