Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

Socio-Economic Ecologies of the Atlanta Home

This course focuses on the socio-economic ecologies that support (or not) the sustainable Purpose Built Communities Model. Organizations like the Grove Park Foundation in Atlanta aim to target issues like unequal housing and education through initiatives such as Mixed Income Housing, Cradle-to-College Education, and community health and wellness programs. However, issues like gentrification, environmental degradation, and economic crises hinder this equitable decision making.

The End is Nigh, Eventually: Global and Local Approaches to the Pre-Apocalypse

Apocalypse (noun): From the Greek apokálypsis, 'Uncovering' The end of the world. The great calamity. The apocalypse. Discussions of climate change, natural disasters, pandemics, and violence have become an everyday occurrence, and the rhetoric surrounding these ideas is often nihilistic -- focused on the inevitability of our destruction – or post-apocalyptic – fixated on how humanity recovers after catastrophic events. But what does it mean to experience the time preceding an apocalypse?

Data Science for Policy

This course provides an introduction to public policy analytics. Students will gain hands-on experience with data discovery, measurement, field testing and policy evaluation, including training in data ethics and human subjects protections. Case examples and projects will draw upon both experimental and observational research as well as large-scale civic data on sustainable communities. For Fall 2022, the course is partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored Jump into STEM competition (https://jumpintostem.org) focused on building energy efficiency.

Organizing for Social Change

“If not us, then who? If not now, then when? Hillel the Elder Collective action enables groups of people to advance solutions to complex social and environmental challenges. In a democratic society, organized groups are better able to develop, articulate, and assert shared interests to advance equity, accountability, effectiveness, and sustainability in social institutions. Individuals and groups often use similar strategies to advance social change within organizations, from universities to corporations and government agencies.

Crossing Borders

In this class, students will learn about causes and effects of migration movements and how they relate to aspects of sustainability by examining cultural artifacts such as literature, film, music etc. produced about and by minorities in German-speaking societies. Students will gain insights in the history of emigration from and immigration to Germany, the culturally and linguistically diverse make-up of German-speaking societies and social and political issues that have affected and changed them and continue to do so.

Language for Business and Technology (LBAT): France

This study abroad LBAT (Language for Business and Technology: France) program includes several courses.  One of these, French Culture and Society, is affiliated with SLS.  Participating students will discover another culture's approach to sustainability: in particular, French cultural attitudes toward ecology, pesticides, GMOs, food additives, nuclear energy, and pollution.

The City in U.S. History

This course surveys the development of cities in the territory that became the United States – from bustling colonial seaports, to dense industrial centers, to sprawling postmodern metropolises.  Such topics as leisure, pleasure, reform, environment, trade, commerce, politics, im/migration, work, family, community, racial and class inequality, suburbanization, planning, redevelopment, gentrification, crime, and homelessness will be covered.

Energy Policy

This course cuts through myths that are pervasive in the media, in public opinion, and in statements by politicians. It will provide students with a theoretical basis from which to assess energy policy options, an understanding of how global energy markets work, and an overview of domestic and international energy policy. The course seeks to build group project skills, and students will produce a policy analysis of policy options related to an energy policy problem.

Introduction to Museum Studies

This introductory class in museum studies is a studio history class, in which you will be learning about museums by researching, doing, and creating. In Spring 2022 we have a unique opportunity to collaborate with the Historic Oakland Foundation and Serve, Learn, Sustain. Our exhibit will be about Atlanta’s Oakland Cemetery, and we will consider Diversity, Equity, Access, and Inclusion as we prepare our exhibit.

Postcolonial Ecofeminism

This course will enable you to become a more effective communicator in various modes, media, and genres by introducing you to diverse representations of postcolonial ecologies. In this course you will watch films and documentaries, read essays, graphic narratives, and short stories, and look at digital story maps to explore the plurality across media of rhetorical constructions of environmental justice. We will begin with analyzing what environmental justice looks like in the postcolonial condition.

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