Sustainable Urban Development

Data Science for Public Policy

Data Science for Public Policy introduces big data for social science and public policy applications. Students learn foundations of data science and learn to
conduct field experiments with an aim to solve social, environmental problems in major policy areas.

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities in terms of races and incomes. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. This unique features affect your life. For example, children from families at the 25th percentile income in Seattle, have economic outcomes comparable to children from families at the median in Atlanta (Raj et al. 2014). Why do Atlanta kids show this poor performance? We study urban economic theory about your life and city.

Sound Poetics x Sound Politics

Building on the multimedia strategies of composition and process students begin to develop in ENGL 1101, this course in multimedia rhetoric examines the influence of sound on experiences of belonging and access in the spaces we occupy and travel through, from the immediate environs of Georgia Tech to public spaces and sites of development throughout Atlanta.  An initial unit builds a vocabulary for recognizing and analyzing sounds in what R.

Virtually Remaking Cities

In addressing their sustainability agenda through design and construction, cities are subject to unique challenges, which requires effective exchange of knowledge and subject matter expertise among distributed project teams. At the same time, design and construction projects are dynamic and uncertain, requiring considerable coordination, communication and leadership to execute. Executing such projects in a virtual environment can offer many advantages and facilitate the design efforts. Yet, coordination, communication and leadership become increasingly difficult.

Policy Tools for Environmental Management

Policy Tools for Environmental Management constructs a general framework for analyzing environmental issues, and develops concepts and techniques for managing environmental systems, within the context of environmental planning and policy within sustainable communities.

Water, Stormwater, Green Infrastructure, and Designing Sustainable Communities

A workshop focusing on collaborative design – involving architects, planners and engineers -  of sustainable stormwater solutions that contribute to community development. The project focus of the workshop will be within the Proctor Creek Watershed and the Georgia Tech Campus. The workshop includes invited lectures from Atlanta and nationally, seminars on critical topics, and student collaborative teams doing project designs and presentations. 

 

Vertically Integrated Project: Civic Data and Design

The purpose of this course is to research and develop information, communication, and media systems to address regional civic issues, using techniques from design, computing, and social sciences, in collaboration with government and community partners.  These systems will have real-world impact, and promote social sustainability, equity, and justice.

Honors Biological Principles

The laboratory portions of the BIOL 1511 and 1521 courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. In partnership with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens (BIOL 1511) and the Piedmont Park Conservancy (BIOL 1521), students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

Technology and Social Context

This tool helps students understand how social context can influence the success or failure of projects; as a result, students will learn to design their own projects, both local and abroad, with attention to the context and the communities in which they’re working. The tool explores three different situations as models for what to do, and what not to do. These include: 1) situations where entities use technology to exploit the population; 2) situations where projects fail by not accounting for the social context of a community, and 3) situations where projects succeed by accounting for the social context of a community.

This tool was contributed by Katie Martin, Bethany Jacobs, Kevin Lanza, Molly Slavin, and Jennifer Hirsch.

Centering Racial Equity

In July 2020, Serve-Learn-Sustain held a virtual panel discussion entitled “Centering Racial Equity in Equitable and Sustainable Development." Panel guests included Nicole Moore, Director of Education at the National Center for Civil and Human Rights; Odetta MacLeish-White, Managing Director of the TransFormation Alliance; and Carol Hunter, Executive Director of the Truly Living Well Center for Natural Urban Agriculture, with discussion facilitated by Rebecca Watts Hull, Service Learning and Partnerships Specialist with Serve-Learn-Sustain. During the event, the panelists discussed the organizations they are a part of and their work advancing racial equity within the communities they serve.

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