Social, Cultural & Environmental Context

Globalization in Latin America

What is globalization? Is it a series of economic adjustments that has resulted in the integration of systems of production and financial markets at a world scale?Alternatively, is it a variety of biological, environmental, political and cultural phenomena that go beyond state governments and involve a number of transnational actors, such as religious organizations, multinational corporations, NGOs, media, and civil society? Does globalization imply more homogeneity or diversity? What does it mean to live in a globalized world? In what ways do global processes affect our lives?

Prototyping Practices for Innovation

Prototypes are typically thought of as nearly complete products or technologies which are used to conduct system, alpha or beta testing near the end of a development process. This course is designed to expand on the idea of prototyping and teach how to employ a variety of tools as methods to inspire, contextualize, evaluate and inform any phase of any research or development activity.

Sound Poetics x Sound Politics

Building on the multimedia strategies of composition and process students begin to develop in ENGL 1101, this course in multimedia rhetoric examines the influence of sound on experiences of belonging and access in the spaces we occupy and travel through, from the immediate environs of Georgia Tech to public spaces and sites of development throughout Atlanta.  An initial unit builds a vocabulary for recognizing and analyzing sounds in what R.

The Rhetorics and Poetics of Dirt

This course asks students to examine what we talk about when we talk about “dirt,” and how do the things we communicate about dirt change its presence in our lives. The major assignments facilitate learning goals through four units: dirt vs. soil, earthworks, dirt stories, and trendy dirt. The primary texts in this course will largely deal with a North American perspective on dirt. We will engage with American film (ex: Grapes of Wrath, Waterworld, Noma, Interstellar, The Martian, the Mad Max megaverse), and contemporary American literature.

Sustainability, Technology, and Policy

This course - taught on the Pacific Program - will develop a theoretical understanding of sustainability, from a bottom-up perspective that considers ecological outcomes as a function of human institutions. It begins with defining and understanding the tragedy of the commons, and develops an understanding of why we might not be doomed to this tragedy. While exploring broad themes in environmental ethics, philosophy, and management, it will explore cases in the Pacific context, and will include a service-learning project in Fiji.

Technology and Society

Technology and Society examines connections between the history of technology and other aspects of human history. The course uses historical episodes to challenge widely held misperceptions about technology and how it operates in the modern world. I argue that technology is a human product, not an autonomous force. Technology makes nothing happen by itself, but only as the result of human action. People can choose to design and use technology in different ways to better serve human needs.

Proctor Creek Wildlife Assessment Course

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is collaborating with Georgia Tech's College of Sciences and Serve-Learn-Sustain Program to create a summer course that introduces students to ecological monitoring techniques through collecting wildlife data within the Proctor Creek watershed. Located less than a mile from Georgia Tech's campus, the historic Proctor Creek neighborhood has been the focus of a community-led effort to restore streams within the watershed.

Making the List: Banned Books, Best Sellers, and Best Of

What makes a book a success? In this writing course, we will examine three measures of book quality: literary prizes, bestseller lists, and the banned book list. The course will include projects that enhance written, oral, visual, electronic and nonverbal (WOVEN) communication skills while honing students’ ability to think and talk critically about literature, culture, and consumer habits within a wide variety of reading communities and other audiences.

Honors Biological Principles

The laboratory portions of the BIOL 1511 and 1521 courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. In partnership with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens (BIOL 1511) and the Piedmont Park Conservancy (BIOL 1521), students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

Technology and Social Context

This tool helps students understand how social context can influence the success or failure of projects; as a result, students will learn to design their own projects, both local and abroad, with attention to the context and the communities in which they’re working. The tool explores three different situations as models for what to do, and what not to do. These include: 1) situations where entities use technology to exploit the population; 2) situations where projects fail by not accounting for the social context of a community, and 3) situations where projects succeed by accounting for the social context of a community.

This tool was contributed by Katie Martin, Bethany Jacobs, Kevin Lanza, Molly Slavin, and Jennifer Hirsch.

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