Social, Cultural & Environmental Context

Social, Cultural & Environmental Context

Science, Technology and Society (STS) - also called Science and Technology Studies - is an interdisciplinary field of study that seeks to understand how science and technology shape society and culture and how society and culture, in turn, shape the development of science and technology.

Intro to Research

This course was created to give students the tools and skills necessary to participate in research as an integral component in their undergraduate experience. This course will explore research ethics (satisfying the research ethics requirements for funding through the NSF, NIH or PURA awards), scientific literacy (finding, reading, and writing research papers), and research careers. The course makes frequent use of case studies and discussions and considers the impact of research and industry on communities.

Race, Medicine, and Science

The primary objective of this course is to study the interrelationship of race, medicine, and science drawing on various literatures such as history, sociology, and anthropology. The course rigorously examines the social, political, and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category with a emphasis on American history.

Immoral Energy: Slavery and Fossil Fuels in the Anthropocene

Energy systems are permeated with political and ethical questions, and no historical system demonstrates that as well as transatlantic slavery. Before fossil fuels, the bodies and labor of enslaved peoples powered trade. While at first slavery helped support the expansion of fossil fuels, eventually fossil fuels replaced slavery. This course will explore the ethical/moral valences of energy systems through a juxtaposition of transatlantic slavery and modern fossil fuels. The first half of the class will focus on the abolition debate.

Sustainable Food Systems

Food nourishes not only our bodies, but our spirits, families, and communities. At its best, food is healthful, economically sustainable, culturally appropriate and environmentally beneficial. Yet, all too often and for too many people, the quantity, quality and character of food remains inadequate for individual nutrition and damaging to our economy, society and environment. Food production and distribution is increasingly mono-culture, globalized and processed, with significant impacts on human well-being, climate, environment, economy, and culture.

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Standing Peachtree and Indigenous New Media

Indigenous knowledges and stories are mapped onto the land beneath your feet and mediated through oral and material modes. Indigenous knowledges and stories continue to be sovereign, embodied through various methods of meaning-making. This course focuses on the rhetorical practices of Native/American Indian communities and how those practices “make” meaning within indigenous communities.

Cultures of Waste: Disease and Environment

This course explores literary and cultural representations of bodily and industrial waste alongside wasting diseases to explore how the nineteenth century produced ideas about waste that continue to influence contemporary work in the fields of epidemiology, civil engineering, public health, environmental science, and medicine.

User Interface Design

This project-based course covers the process of designing high-quality user interfaces to computing systems. It walks teams step-by-step through the user-centered design process, resulting in novel UI designs that meet users' needs and even delight them. The class covers theories informing UI design and evaluation, reviews the state of the art in interaction and presentation techniques, including user input techniques and the state of the art in graphical, audio, and haptic feedback.

Climate Resilience

The rapid change in climates across the globe requires us to determine which human and ecological systems will be most affected and how to alleviate climate vulnerability, which is captured by the concept climate resilience. While past studies have largely focused on climate resilience through the lens of either ecological or social systems, there is great potential in quantifying and optimizing climate resilience through the study of integrated social-ecological systems. Social, agricultural, and ecological systems are spatially and functionally integrated.

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