Collaborative Problem-Solving

Women in Science Fiction

Women in Science Fiction studies women writers, artists, and musicians who use science fiction to propose and debate how we might make our world more sustainable. Engaging topics like race, gender, and the environment, these women craft futures that may sometimes appear fantastical or otherwise out of reach. However, this course asserts the real-world stakes of its subject matter for Georgia Tech students. Our readings will spur discussions and assignments about today’s sustainability challenges. This will include an exciting partnership with Prof.

Curating Safe Space: LIVE WORK LEARN PLAY GROW

In partnership with The Pride School Atlanta, this course explores advocacy through the design of space at three scales of architecture (in this case, as the design of building): interior space, the building, and the landscape. Can architects re-imagine the future of educational spaces and social equity by placing attention to the bidirectional relationships of space and behavior within the context of gender equality and human rights? Can advocacy become a mainstream practice, a political voice, for architects?

The Rhetorics and Poetics of Dirt

This course asks students to examine what we talk about when we talk about “dirt,” and how do the things we communicate about dirt change its presence in our lives. The major assignments facilitate learning goals through four units: dirt vs. soil, earthworks, dirt stories, and trendy dirt. The primary texts in this course will largely deal with a North American perspective on dirt. We will engage with American film (ex: Grapes of Wrath, Waterworld, Noma, Interstellar, The Martian, the Mad Max megaverse), and contemporary American literature.

Sustainability, Technology, and Policy

This course - taught on the Pacific Program - will develop a theoretical understanding of sustainability, from a bottom-up perspective that considers ecological outcomes as a function of human institutions. It begins with defining and understanding the tragedy of the commons, and develops an understanding of why we might not be doomed to this tragedy. While exploring broad themes in environmental ethics, philosophy, and management, it will explore cases in the Pacific context, and will include a service-learning project in Fiji.

Architecture Design Studio I

In partnership with The Pride School Atlanta, this course explores advocacy through the design of space at three scales of architecture (in this case, as the design of building): interior space, the building, and the landscape. Can architects re-imagine the future of educational spaces and social equity by placing attention to the bidirectional relationships of space and behavior within the context of gender equality and human rights? Can advocacy become a mainstream practice, a political voice, for architects?

Virtually Remaking Cities

In addressing their sustainability agenda through design and construction, cities are subject to unique challenges, which requires effective exchange of knowledge and subject matter expertise among distributed project teams. At the same time, design and construction projects are dynamic and uncertain, requiring considerable coordination, communication and leadership to execute. Executing such projects in a virtual environment can offer many advantages and facilitate the design efforts. Yet, coordination, communication and leadership become increasingly difficult.

Collaborative Design

Collaborative Design is a course focused on inquiry-based learning in a project-based environment. Student teams will learn to work together creatively, in a hands-on environment, with emerging technologies to design innovative products or services. The course aims to teach design thinking as an approach that can be used to consider issues and resolve problems more broadly, and promote self-directed learning that can be applied inside and outside the classroom.

GT 2000

Transfer students will start their Georgia Tech experience on the right foot with this GT 2000 seminar which covers topics critical to a transfer student’s success. And, through activities and field trips you will also learn the fundamentals of how to shape and be part of a sustainable community. 

Collaborative Design

Collaborative Design is a course focused on inquiry-based learning in a project-based environment. Student teams will learn to work together creatively, in a hands-on environment, with emerging technologies to design innovative products or services. The course aims to teach design thinking as an approach that can be used to consider issues and resolve problems more broadly, and promote self-directed learning that can be applied inside and outside the classroom.

Honors Biological Principles

The laboratory portions of the BIOL 1511 and 1521 courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. In partnership with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens (BIOL 1511) and the Piedmont Park Conservancy (BIOL 1521), students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

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